Search: relactation

  • Relactation and Induced Lactation Resources
  • Bibliography By Kelly Bonyata, BS, IBCLC Relactation Induced Lactation and Adoptive Breastfeeding Publications Relactation @ Adoptive Breastfeeding & Relactation @ other websites La Leche League Relactation stories from LLL’s New Beginnings World Health Organization Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development. Relactation: A review of experience and recommendations for practice (WHO/CHS/CAH/98.14). Geneva: World…

  • Relactation and Adoptive Breastfeeding: The Basics
  • By Kelly Bonyata, BS, IBCLC Relactation or induced lactation (for those who did not give birth to their baby) is essentially a two-fold process: You will be teaching (or re-teaching) baby to nurse at the breast, and to equate nursing with comfort. If you’re having problems getting baby to nurse, see Help — My Baby Won’t Nurse! At the same time you will be de…

  • Weaning from formula supplements
  • Put baby to breast often Aim for 10 breastfeeding sessons per day. If baby is not breastfeeding well, work with your lactation consultant. Image credit: Jerry Bunkers on flickr Method for weaning from supplements Do not drop supplements suddenly – this should be a gradual process. Prepare: Talk to baby’s health care provider and get his/her input. Record supplement amounts for a few days to determine how much supplement baby is getting per day…

  • Notes from “Induced Lactation and Adoptive Nursing”
  • These are notes that I took during a LLLI conference session presented by Sharon Larsen, RN and Kerry Yancy Dolan, MD (July 4, 1999) Reasons for adoptive breastfeeding Physiology * Hormones * What’s normal for adoptive mothers who are nursing Issues * Uncertainty of adoption * Use of breastpump prior to adoption/placement * Medications * Herbs Useful Publications Men…

  • Help — My Baby Won’t Nurse!
  • By Kelly Bonyata, BS, IBCLC Introduction The Basics Follow the Rules Suggestions for a typical nursing session Feed the Baby! Maintaining milk supply when baby is not nursing Coaxing baby to the breast General Tips “Instant Reward” techniques Skin to Skin/Laid Back Breastfeeding Working with a baby who is actively resisting nursing Bottles – yes or no? Nursing Strikes Links to Additional Information General Nursing Strik…

  • Prescription drugs used for increasing milk supply
  • By Kelly Bonyata, IBCLC There are several prescription drugs that have been used to increase milk supply: Metoclopramide (Reglan), Domperidone (Motilium), and sulpiride (Eglonyl, Dolmatil, Sulpitil, Sulparex, Equemote). The presence of an appropriate level of the hormone prolactin permits lactation to proceed normally. When a mother has low prolactin levels, milk supply may be affected. Prolactin levels are primarily regulated by inhibition: the…